Net Neutrality Rules Bill Faces Uphill Climb As Moves To Reinstate Save The Internet Act Start

Net Neutrality Rules Bill Faces Uphill Climb As Moves To Reinstate Save The Internet Act Start

Source: fortune.com

Net Neutrality Rules Bill Faces Uphill Climb As Moves To Reinstate Save The Internet Act Start

Net Neutrality Rules Bill Faces Uphill Climb As Moves To Reinstate Save The Internet Act Start
Source: fortune.com

The House claimed a small victory after voting to reinstate net neutrality rules on Wednesday on a vote of 232-190.

However, the Save the Internet Act still faces two major hurdles: the Republican-controlled Senate and the White House. Both will prove too much to surmount.

But there’s a silver lining in the horizon as one Republican in the House did vote in favor of net neutrality rules. The legislation prohibited broadband service providers from regulating and controlling Internet traffic. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) quickly repealed the Obama-era legislation in 2017.

However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel already issued a declaration that the House bill won’t pass. In fact, the phrase he used was “dead on arrival,” which should kill off all hopes for the bill.

If, in case of a miracle that it will be approved in the Senate, it will still pass through President Trump’s desk. If that happens, expect Trump to veto the bill on the recommendation of the Office of Management and Budget.

The net neutrality bill is actually the advocacy for equal treatment. This means that Broadband service providers can’t play favorites between fast and slow data transfer.

In 2015, the FCC okayed regulations that recognize telecommunications as a public utility. That means telecommunications providers like Verizon, Sprint, and AT&T can’t give preferential treatment to Spotify or Apple Music.

The crux of the debates is the definition of the Internet. A small change in the term drastically changes the way regulations are applied to it. Title I means that Internet providers are classified as communications services. Title II classifies them as common carriers.

If they are classified as common carriers, they would have to go through more stringent regulatory measures. Their classification would be similar to an electric utility, water, and gas. This also means that the FCC will wield more control on the oversight and regulation. The commission can also impose hefty fines on the violators.

Just one year after it was okayed by the FCC, the new commissioner Ajit Pai reversed the net neutrality rules in 2017. Ajit was a Trump appointee.

While the net neutrality rules might not be able to survive this bipartisan battle, it’s not totally hopeless for the bill. The Politico said that this could be a major issue in the 2020 elections. The Democrats could take advantage of the bill’s death by carrying it as one of their major agenda.