Nearly 50 Percent Of All Epic Game Store Account Owners Reveal That They Don’t Own A Steam Account

Nearly 50 Percent Of All Epic Game Store Account Owners Reveal That They Don’t Own A Steam Account

Nearly 50 Percent Of All Epic Game Store Account Owners Reveal That They Don’t Own A Steam Account

Nearly 50 Percent Of All Epic Game Store Account Owners Reveal That They Don’t Own A Steam Account

In the recent GDC presentation, Epic Games revealed that currently, there are approximately 85 million users of their store. Also, the user survey conducted from August 2018 to January 2019 revealed that 40%of these users don’t have Steam accounts.

Valve hasn’t released a more recent report on the total count of registered Steam accounts. Last January, however, they reported around 90 million users currently active on Steam.

In the survey performed by Epic, it showed that around 68 percent of Epic users don’t “regularly” use Steam. This figure, according to critics, is appallingly high considering that Steam boasts of more than a decade platform dominance.

The survey revealed that Fortnite is the x-factor in this case. The slide presentations also showed that many Epic store PC users play using consoles regularly than on Steam.

Currently, there are nearly 55,000 registered game Creators active on Epic store. There are also around 41 million gamers supporting these creators across all their games and in all platforms.

All these data and figures point to the fact that Steam is definitely growing faster. Recently, it passed the 30,000-game mark.

With all the data Valve collectively served-up, it’s fascinating that their concurrent users went down since their 2018 record-breaking record.

What showed this steady decline clearly is the SteamDB chart. In the said chart, the number of users declined daily all through the summer of 2018. Fortunately, after a steady decrease, the number eventually rebounded to 17.5 million at the start of 2019.

Epic’s recent presentation also re-emphasized what Tim Sweeney revealed in his recent interviews. He said that Epic wants to curate who and what is on their store. This approach is clearly opposite of Steam’s “anything goes” approach.

A later slide also added that Epic currently can’t welcome and accommodate everyone and they’re sorry about it. They also said that they’re currently working hard and incessantly to provide more support to more games.

Epic store will slowly but steadily open the platform to more developers as this year culminates. They will also be welcoming more quality games with the intention of preventing asset-flips and porn from landing the store.

Epic also wants the community to know that they can use their service even if it was launched on Steam.

This is coherent with the latest announcement made by Epic saying that their online services are available for developers. On top of that, these services will also be accessible for free.

This includes support ticketing, analytics, voice chat, purchase management, inventory, matchmaking, and friends list specifically designed for Fortnite.